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February 5, 2008, 12:10 pm CST

News, Politics and Current Events

Quote From: fredastare

Hi is it Beverly?

 

I'm just thinking that as your username is B....*vowel*.....

 

Well, I'm not sure where you got you stats, but speaking as a Can*eh*dian I will tell you that although Universal Health Care is not perfect....it really isn't as scary as you may believe.

 

The wait times have been reduced significantly.  As far as requiring certain tests and or surgery's it basically works up here like a triage situation.  Those most in dire need go directly to the front of the line so to speak.

 

I must say, it's a huge relief knowing that no matter what, no matter how much money I've got in the bank, or what sort of added insurance I don't have to worry about anyone in my household creating a financial burden if medical treatment is required.

 

Big brow wipe....LOL!

 

Here's a few stat's from Wikipedia....

 

I have to take off for the afternoon yet will be back either later this evening or tomorrow and answer any Q's anyone may have.

 

 

The Canadian health care system is often compared to the US system. The US system spends the most in the world per capita, and was ranked 37th in the world by the World Health Organization in 2000, while Canada's health system was ranked 30th. The WHO ranking has been criticized by some for its choice of ranking criteria and statistical methods, and the WHO is currently revising its methodology and withholding new rankings until the issues are addressed.[47[48

Canada spent approximately 9.8% of GDP on health care in 2005, almost one percentage point higher than the average of 9.0% in OECD countries.[28 According to the Canadian Institute for Health Information, spending is expected to reach $160 billion, or 10.6% of GDP, in 2007.[49 This translates to $4,867 per person.

Most health statistics in Canada are at or above the G7 average.[50 Direct comparisons of health statistics across nations is complex. The OECD collects comparative statistics, and has published brief country profiles.[51

Country Life expectancy Infant mortality rate Physicians per 1000 people Nurses per 1000 people Per capita expenditure on health (USD) Healthcare costs as a percent of GDP % of government revenue spent on health % of health costs paid by government Australia 80.5 5.0 2.47 9.71 2,519 9.5 17.7 67.5 Canada 80.5 5.0 2.14 9.95 2,669 9.9 16.7 69.9 France 79.5 4.0 3.37 7.24 2,981 10.1 14.2 76.3 Germany 80.0 4.0 3.37 9.72 3,204 11.1 17.6 78.2 Japan 82.5 3.0 1.98 7.79 2,662 7.9 16.8 81.0 Sweden 80.5 3.0 3.28 10.24 3,149 9.4 13.6 85.2 UK 79.5 5.0 2.30 12.12 2,428 8.0 15.8 85.7 US 77.5 6.0 2.56 9.37 5,711 15.2 18.5 44.6

 

 

 

If you ask me, that life expectancy differential is rather *scary*.

 

 

UHC......like I said isn't so terrible, sure there are aspects that need to be addressed, yet it's a wonderful feeling knowing that we won't have to mortgage our home in order to provide health care for anyone in the family.    : )

 

 

Have a great day all,

 

 

<3

 

Fredi

 

 

 

Wow,

 

Sorry that c & p job didn't pan out so great....

 

I'll try again, later.

 

 

 
February 5, 2008, 12:17 pm CST

News, Politics and Current Events

One last thing....

 

Baeiouy,

 

your stat's are way off....I'd love to know where you got this stuff?

 

Also,

 

umm....our doc's actually are not *imported*.....good grief, that's just silly.

 

Okay,

 

gotta run for real now....

 

 

 

 
February 5, 2008, 12:44 pm CST

News, Politics and Current Events

Quote From: fredastare

Hi is it Beverly?

 

I'm just thinking that as your username is B....*vowel*.....

 

Well, I'm not sure where you got you stats, but speaking as a Can*eh*dian I will tell you that although Universal Health Care is not perfect....it really isn't as scary as you may believe.

 

The wait times have been reduced significantly.  As far as requiring certain tests and or surgery's it basically works up here like a triage situation.  Those most in dire need go directly to the front of the line so to speak.

 

I must say, it's a huge relief knowing that no matter what, no matter how much money I've got in the bank, or what sort of added insurance I don't have to worry about anyone in my household creating a financial burden if medical treatment is required.

 

Big brow wipe....LOL!

 

Here's a few stat's from Wikipedia....

 

I have to take off for the afternoon yet will be back either later this evening or tomorrow and answer any Q's anyone may have.

 

 

The Canadian health care system is often compared to the US system. The US system spends the most in the world per capita, and was ranked 37th in the world by the World Health Organization in 2000, while Canada's health system was ranked 30th. The WHO ranking has been criticized by some for its choice of ranking criteria and statistical methods, and the WHO is currently revising its methodology and withholding new rankings until the issues are addressed.[47[48

Canada spent approximately 9.8% of GDP on health care in 2005, almost one percentage point higher than the average of 9.0% in OECD countries.[28 According to the Canadian Institute for Health Information, spending is expected to reach $160 billion, or 10.6% of GDP, in 2007.[49 This translates to $4,867 per person.

Most health statistics in Canada are at or above the G7 average.[50 Direct comparisons of health statistics across nations is complex. The OECD collects comparative statistics, and has published brief country profiles.[51

Country Life expectancy Infant mortality rate Physicians per 1000 people Nurses per 1000 people Per capita expenditure on health (USD) Healthcare costs as a percent of GDP % of government revenue spent on health % of health costs paid by government Australia 80.5 5.0 2.47 9.71 2,519 9.5 17.7 67.5 Canada 80.5 5.0 2.14 9.95 2,669 9.9 16.7 69.9 France 79.5 4.0 3.37 7.24 2,981 10.1 14.2 76.3 Germany 80.0 4.0 3.37 9.72 3,204 11.1 17.6 78.2 Japan 82.5 3.0 1.98 7.79 2,662 7.9 16.8 81.0 Sweden 80.5 3.0 3.28 10.24 3,149 9.4 13.6 85.2 UK 79.5 5.0 2.30 12.12 2,428 8.0 15.8 85.7 US 77.5 6.0 2.56 9.37 5,711 15.2 18.5 44.6

 

 

 

If you ask me, that life expectancy differential is rather *scary*.

 

 

UHC......like I said isn't so terrible, sure there are aspects that need to be addressed, yet it's a wonderful feeling knowing that we won't have to mortgage our home in order to provide health care for anyone in the family.    : )

 

 

Have a great day all,

 

 

<3

 

Fredi

 

 

 

Well, I'm not sure where you got you stats, but speaking as a Can*eh*dian I will tell you that although Universal Health Care is not perfect....it really isn't as scary as you may believe.

 

I got my stats from doctors from Canada that want to show that Universal Health Care is not that way to go. it is in a number of newspapers.  If you go to a number of different sites they will give you the actually numbers.  I am sure being from Canada you know about people being flown to the US to give birth, just one example.  Living in a border city, I see this all of the time.  That illegal private practices are popping up.  That a number of Canadians have health care in the US.  I wonder why that is?  Not to mention that Canada Health Care does not cover all medication, the government (seeing that is who is paying for it), says what they will provide and what they wont, even though other treatment or medication maybe better for you.

 

The wait times have been reduced significantly.  As far as requiring certain tests and or surgery's it basically works up here like a triage situation.  Those most in dire need go directly to the front of the line so to speak.

 

I was talking to a doctor from Canada and asked him that if someone that was in their 30s would survive breast cancer.  He actually told me that they would never even be screened for it because that is not the age where they would start.

 

There is a difference between having a cold, broken arm and having cancer.  If you go into any hospital in the States NO ONE can be turned away, NO ONE. 

 

I was on a train ride in Germany and I met a father and daughter from Canada, we started talking and the view of health care came up.  He said that it was wonderful that he had prostate problems and he was happy that he got into a special within 6 months.  WHAT?!?!?!  He was complaining though that the doctors in Canada are not actually from there and are not highly trained.  Whether that is true or not, got that from him

 

 If you ask me, that life expectancy differential is rather *scary*.

 

Do you know how WHO gathers data, they ask the countries?  In a number of countries they dont consider it a "live" birth if it dies during birth or a couple of days afterward.  Now that is scary.

 

UHC......like I said isn't so terrible, sure there are aspects that need to be addressed, yet it's a wonderful feeling knowing that we won't have to mortgage our home in order to provide health care for anyone in the family. 

 

Yes it isnt so terrible when you are healthy.  That is why people have health insurance.  My mom had cancer when she was 36, yet my parents didnt have to mortgage the house, file bankruptcy (this was also when it was day to day if my dad was still going to be employed).  Then when my dad was 55 he almost died, heart problems, once again had no problems with any of paying it.  The good news is that because of the health care in this country both of my parents are still alive, not sure I can say the same if they lived anywhere else.

  

 

 
February 5, 2008, 12:58 pm CST

News, Politics and Current Events

Quote From: fredastare

One last thing....

 

Baeiouy,

 

your stat's are way off....I'd love to know where you got this stuff?

 

Also,

 

umm....our doc's actually are not *imported*.....good grief, that's just silly.

 

Okay,

 

gotta run for real now....

 

 

 

your stat's are way off....I'd love to know where you got this stuff?

 

Sorry the stats arent off at all.  If you actually look you will find them too.  But you have to look at an unbiased source.

 

Heck this is just from Wikipedia.  Once again it is a great system as long as you dont get sick.

 

Canadians visiting the U.S. to receive health care

Some residents of Canada travel to the United States in frustration with the limitations of their own health care system, as illustrated by the following examples:

  • According to a September 14, 2007, article from CTV News, Canadian Liberal MP Belinda Stronach went to the United States for breast cancer surgery in June 2007. Stronach's spokesperson Greg MacEachern was quoted in the article saying that the US was the best place to have this type of surgery done. Stronach paid for the surgery out of her own pocket.[37] Prior to this incident, Stronach had stated in an interview that she was against two-tiered health care.[38]
  • When Robert Bouressa, the premier of Quebec, needed cancer treatment, he went to the US to get it.[39]
  • In 2007, it was reported that Canada sent scores of pregnant women to the US to give birth.[40] In 2007 a woman from Calgary who was pregnant with quadruplets was sent to Great Falls, Montana to give birth. An article on this incident states, "There was no room at any other Canadian neonatal intensive care unit."[41]
  • Champion figure skater Audrey Williams needed a hip replacement. Even though she waited two years and suffered in pain, she still did not get the surgery, because the waiting list was so long. So she went to the US and spent her own money to get the surgery.[42]
  • A January 19, 2008, article in The Globe And Mail states, "More than 150 critically ill Canadians – many with life-threatening cerebral hemorrhages – have been rushed to the United States since the spring of 2006 because they could not obtain intensive-care beds here. Before patients with bleeding in or outside the brain have been whisked through U.S. operating-room doors, some have languished for as long as eight hours in Canadian emergency wards while health-care workers scrambled to locate care."

People from the US go to Canada for medical marijuana or prescription medication.  It is not really surprising that in the US medication is expensive, I mean you dont hear of other countries finding ways to battle diseases.

 

umm....our doc's actually are not *imported*.....good grief, that's just silly.

 

Okay imported was the wrong word, more like there are quite a bit that are there on employment visas.  The Health Organization is starting to give incentives for people born in Canada to practice medicine there instead of coming to the US, where you can say they will actually practice medicine.

 

This information is out there if one wishes to find it.  Socialized anything is not the way to go in any aspect of the word.  We already see that it doesnt last in the long run.

 

Not to mention that Universal Health Care would never work in the US.

 
February 5, 2008, 1:12 pm CST

News, Politics and Current Events

Quote From: baeiouy

Well, I'm not sure where you got you stats, but speaking as a Can*eh*dian I will tell you that although Universal Health Care is not perfect....it really isn't as scary as you may believe.

 

I got my stats from doctors from Canada that want to show that Universal Health Care is not that way to go. it is in a number of newspapers.  If you go to a number of different sites they will give you the actually numbers.  I am sure being from Canada you know about people being flown to the US to give birth, just one example.  Living in a border city, I see this all of the time.  That illegal private practices are popping up.  That a number of Canadians have health care in the US.  I wonder why that is?  Not to mention that Canada Health Care does not cover all medication, the government (seeing that is who is paying for it), says what they will provide and what they wont, even though other treatment or medication maybe better for you.

 

The wait times have been reduced significantly.  As far as requiring certain tests and or surgery's it basically works up here like a triage situation.  Those most in dire need go directly to the front of the line so to speak.

 

I was talking to a doctor from Canada and asked him that if someone that was in their 30s would survive breast cancer.  He actually told me that they would never even be screened for it because that is not the age where they would start.

 

There is a difference between having a cold, broken arm and having cancer.  If you go into any hospital in the States NO ONE can be turned away, NO ONE. 

 

I was on a train ride in Germany and I met a father and daughter from Canada, we started talking and the view of health care came up.  He said that it was wonderful that he had prostate problems and he was happy that he got into a special within 6 months.  WHAT?!?!?!  He was complaining though that the doctors in Canada are not actually from there and are not highly trained.  Whether that is true or not, got that from him

 

 If you ask me, that life expectancy differential is rather *scary*.

 

Do you know how WHO gathers data, they ask the countries?  In a number of countries they dont consider it a "live" birth if it dies during birth or a couple of days afterward.  Now that is scary.

 

UHC......like I said isn't so terrible, sure there are aspects that need to be addressed, yet it's a wonderful feeling knowing that we won't have to mortgage our home in order to provide health care for anyone in the family. 

 

Yes it isnt so terrible when you are healthy.  That is why people have health insurance.  My mom had cancer when she was 36, yet my parents didnt have to mortgage the house, file bankruptcy (this was also when it was day to day if my dad was still going to be employed).  Then when my dad was 55 he almost died, heart problems, once again had no problems with any of paying it.  The good news is that because of the health care in this country both of my parents are still alive, not sure I can say the same if they lived anywhere else.

  

 

I was talking to a doctor from Canada and asked him that if someone that was in their 30s would survive breast cancer.  He actually told me that they would never even be screened for it because that is not the age where they would start.

 

In the US many insurance companies will not pay for a mammogram screening until a woman reaches the age of 40.  I had to get special approval with doctor's permission to have one covered at age 38 after a friend was diagnosed.  So it is the same here. Colonoscopy before the age of 50, forget about it.  A doctor actually told someone I knew to claim that they had blood in the stool so the insurance would pay for it.

 

Yes it isn't so terrible when you are healthy.  That is why people have health insurance.  My mom had cancer when she was 36, yet my parents didnt have to mortgage the house, file bankruptcy (this was also when it was day to day if my dad was still going to be employed).  Then when my dad was 55 he almost died, heart problems, once again had no problems with any of paying it.  The good news is that because of the health care in this country both of my parents are still alive, not sure I can say the same if they lived anywhere else.

 

The problem is that not everyone is lucky enough to have health insurance.  If you are self employed/small business owner as I was you PAY big time for health coverage.  For a family of 4 with no pre existing medical conditions we paid $500 a month.  You want to know what that covered.  NOTHING, NADA, ZIP.  unless of course we got cancer or had another catastrophic problem.  So we paid our own routine health care costs.  Average with checkups, dental care, ear infections, etc.  about another $1,000 a month.  So we are now up to $1,500 a month to cover basic health care.  We gave up the business in large part due to the need for real medical coverage, my spouse returned to corporate America and we now pay a fraction of what we had. 

 

Insurance, it's great if everyone had it but not everyone can afford to pay as we did.  Does that mean that they should not be entitled to medical care?  While I am leery of a full UHC plan, I do know that what we currently have is great if you have insurance and not so much if you don't. 

 

BTW, when quoting statistics as you did in your initial post, sources would be appreciated.  Other wise the information appears to be suspect.

  

 

 

 

 

 
February 5, 2008, 1:52 pm CST

News, Politics and Current Events

Quote From: loretta24

I was talking to a doctor from Canada and asked him that if someone that was in their 30s would survive breast cancer.  He actually told me that they would never even be screened for it because that is not the age where they would start.

 

In the US many insurance companies will not pay for a mammogram screening until a woman reaches the age of 40.  I had to get special approval with doctor's permission to have one covered at age 38 after a friend was diagnosed.  So it is the same here. Colonoscopy before the age of 50, forget about it.  A doctor actually told someone I knew to claim that they had blood in the stool so the insurance would pay for it.

 

Yes it isn't so terrible when you are healthy.  That is why people have health insurance.  My mom had cancer when she was 36, yet my parents didnt have to mortgage the house, file bankruptcy (this was also when it was day to day if my dad was still going to be employed).  Then when my dad was 55 he almost died, heart problems, once again had no problems with any of paying it.  The good news is that because of the health care in this country both of my parents are still alive, not sure I can say the same if they lived anywhere else.

 

The problem is that not everyone is lucky enough to have health insurance.  If you are self employed/small business owner as I was you PAY big time for health coverage.  For a family of 4 with no pre existing medical conditions we paid $500 a month.  You want to know what that covered.  NOTHING, NADA, ZIP.  unless of course we got cancer or had another catastrophic problem.  So we paid our own routine health care costs.  Average with checkups, dental care, ear infections, etc.  about another $1,000 a month.  So we are now up to $1,500 a month to cover basic health care.  We gave up the business in large part due to the need for real medical coverage, my spouse returned to corporate America and we now pay a fraction of what we had. 

 

Insurance, it's great if everyone had it but not everyone can afford to pay as we did.  Does that mean that they should not be entitled to medical care?  While I am leery of a full UHC plan, I do know that what we currently have is great if you have insurance and not so much if you don't. 

 

BTW, when quoting statistics as you did in your initial post, sources would be appreciated.  Other wise the information appears to be suspect.

  

 

 

 

 

In the US many insurance companies will not pay for a mammogram screening until a woman reaches the age of 40.  I had to get special approval with doctor's permission to have one covered at age 38 after a friend was diagnosed.  So it is the same here. Colonoscopy before the age of 50, forget about it.  A doctor actually told someone I knew to claim that they had blood in the stool so the insurance would pay for it.

 

I am 30 and I have been getting them since I was 25.  All my doctor had to do was call over and say that I needed this done.  I was scheduled the next day.

 

I guess you see special approval as your doctor writing or calling over. 

 

Dont think our system is the best, heavens no can be worked on, but I would actually like to have a health care.

 

The problem is that not everyone is lucky enough to have health insurance.  If you are self employed/small business owner as I was you PAY big time for health coverage.  For a family of 4 with no pre existing medical conditions we paid $500 a month.  You want to know what that covered.  NOTHING, NADA, ZIP.  unless of course we got cancer or had another catastrophic problem.  So we paid our own routine health care costs.  Average with checkups, dental care, ear infections, etc.  about another $1,000 a month.  So we are now up to $1,500 a month to cover basic health care.  We gave up the business in large part due to the need for real medical coverage, my spouse returned to corporate America and we now pay a fraction of what we had. 

 

Once again not saying that it is the best.  Also business owners are part of the 40 million people that are uninsuranced.

 

Insurance, it's great if everyone had it but not everyone can afford to pay as we did.  Does that mean that they should not be entitled to medical care?  While I am leery of a full UHC plan, I do know that what we currently have is great if you have insurance and not so much if you don't. 

 

How many people do you know that have been turned away from a hospital when they were about to give birth?  My guess is zero.  How many people do you know that has been turned away at all?  Also why is it the federal governments job to support people?  Never understood why people feel if something goes wrong in their life, their doing or not, it is the government that should pay for it (I am thinking about the housing right now).

 

Here is one story about one woman that had to be flown to the US.

 

Canada's 'universal' health care Thomas Lifson    American Thinker   Canada welcomes the birth of the newest set of quadruplets born to proud Canadian parents. Karen and J.P. Jepp. However, the Jepp quads will be eligible to run for the presidency of the United States when they reach the age of 35, having been born in Benefis Hospital in Great Falls, Montana, 325 miles from their home in Calgary, capital of the Canadian oil industry.


 

The precious gift of American citizenship comes to the Jepp Quads because there were no hospital facilities anywhere in Canada able to handle 4 neonatal intensive care babies. Not in Calgary, a city of over a million people, the wealthiest in Canada, or anywhere else in Canada.  Local officials looked.

However, Great Falls, a city of well under one hundred thousand people, apparently had no problem with unusual demand for such facilities.


 

As Don Surber points out, the United States functions as Canada's back-up medical system, enabling it to run with less investment in facilities. America's evil, heartless private medical care system saved the day. In any capital-intensive field, whether it be electric power generation or medicine, gearing up for peak demand costs a lot of money. California discovered this a few years ago when it started to experience rolling blackouts in the wake of bungled partial deregulation of power.

 

BTW, when quoting statistics as you did in your initial post, sources would be appreciated.  Other wise the information appears to be suspect.

 

I wrote it down when I read it.  That is why I didnt have the actually source.  I got it from Townhall.com though a couple of months ago. 

 

Here is another site that I have found.  I dont think I can post actually website though.  The stats here are compared to all countries that have Universal Health Care.

 

The Ugly Truth About Canadian Health Care
David Gratzer

 

One often hears variations on Krugman’s argument—that America lags behind other countries in crude health outcomes. But such outcomes reflect a mosaic of factors, such as diet, lifestyle, drug use, and cultural values. It pains me as a doctor to say this, but health care is just one factor in health. Americans live 75.3 years on average, fewer than Canadians (77.3) or the French (76.6) or the citizens of any Western European nation save Portugal. Health care influences life expectancy, of course. But a life can end because of a murder, a fall, or a car accident. Such factors aren’t academic—homicide rates in the United States are much higher than in other countries (eight times higher than in France, for instance). In The Business of Health, Robert Ohsfeldt and John Schneider factor out intentional and unintentional injuries from life-expectancy statistics and find that Americans who don’t die in car crashes or homicides outlive people in any other Western country.

 

And if we measure a health-care system by how well it serves its sick citizens, American medicine excels. Five-year cancer survival rates bear this out. For leukemia, the American survival rate is almost 50 percent; the European rate is just 35 percent. Esophageal carcinoma: 12 percent in the United States, 6 percent in Europe. The survival rate for prostate cancer is 81.2 percent here, yet 61.7 percent in France and down to 44.3 percent in England—a striking variation.

 

 

 

 
February 5, 2008, 2:06 pm CST

News, Politics and Current Events

This talks about wait time in Canada.

 

Long Waits for Health Care
Plague Canada By Sean Parnell, The Heartland Institute

In Canada found the median wait from the time a patient was referred by a general practitioner until the time he or she actually received treatment was 17.7 weeks. (Median wait means half of all patients waited less and half waited longer.)

 

Waits varied by province and by specialty, the study noted. Ontario had the shortest median wait at 16.3 weeks, while Saskatchewan had the longest, 25.5 weeks. Cancer patients had the shortest median wait--5.5 weeks for medical oncology and 5.7 weeks for radiation oncology. Orthopedic patients had the longest waits, at 40 weeks.

There is no comparable measurement for waits in the United States because health care generally remains in the private sector and long waits for needed care are typically not a problem.

 

 

 

In one of these articles is said that 1 million (about 12%) of people in Ontario do not have a doctor.  Not sure what you do when you dont have a doctor.   According to Wikipedia Ontario has almost 13 million people living there.

 

 

 
February 5, 2008, 2:09 pm CST

News, Politics and Current Events

Quote From: loretta24

I was talking to a doctor from Canada and asked him that if someone that was in their 30s would survive breast cancer.  He actually told me that they would never even be screened for it because that is not the age where they would start.

 

In the US many insurance companies will not pay for a mammogram screening until a woman reaches the age of 40.  I had to get special approval with doctor's permission to have one covered at age 38 after a friend was diagnosed.  So it is the same here. Colonoscopy before the age of 50, forget about it.  A doctor actually told someone I knew to claim that they had blood in the stool so the insurance would pay for it.

 

Yes it isn't so terrible when you are healthy.  That is why people have health insurance.  My mom had cancer when she was 36, yet my parents didnt have to mortgage the house, file bankruptcy (this was also when it was day to day if my dad was still going to be employed).  Then when my dad was 55 he almost died, heart problems, once again had no problems with any of paying it.  The good news is that because of the health care in this country both of my parents are still alive, not sure I can say the same if they lived anywhere else.

 

The problem is that not everyone is lucky enough to have health insurance.  If you are self employed/small business owner as I was you PAY big time for health coverage.  For a family of 4 with no pre existing medical conditions we paid $500 a month.  You want to know what that covered.  NOTHING, NADA, ZIP.  unless of course we got cancer or had another catastrophic problem.  So we paid our own routine health care costs.  Average with checkups, dental care, ear infections, etc.  about another $1,000 a month.  So we are now up to $1,500 a month to cover basic health care.  We gave up the business in large part due to the need for real medical coverage, my spouse returned to corporate America and we now pay a fraction of what we had. 

 

Insurance, it's great if everyone had it but not everyone can afford to pay as we did.  Does that mean that they should not be entitled to medical care?  While I am leery of a full UHC plan, I do know that what we currently have is great if you have insurance and not so much if you don't. 

 

BTW, when quoting statistics as you did in your initial post, sources would be appreciated.  Other wise the information appears to be suspect.

  

 

 

 

 

The debate about HC isn't new, folks: it's been going on for most of my lifetime, at the very least. I can recall as a teen the discussions about what was in the 1970s referred to scathingly as "socialized medicine." Back then, the docs were the loudest screamers against it, giving dire warnings that care would be rationed, that "government bureaucrats would really be making the decisions about medical care."

 

Golly gee, what do we have now?  A private insurance bureaucracy wherein insurance company bureaucrats de facto make the care decisions, and the docs don't like it.

 

Granted, no system is "terrible when you are healthy." The problem comes in when you or a family member actually gets sick and has to navigate whatever system is in place. MUCH depends on your insurer in the US.

 

And yes, I have first-hand experience in dealing with private insurance bureaucracy: I have a FOUR-INCH THICK mishmash of paperwork, correspondence, EOBs, bills, etc. between me and my then-insurance carrier (supposedly one of the "good" ones) stemming from the pregnancy with, birth of, and subsequent care for my now 12-y/o daughter. She had the misfortune of having a placental abruption occur while I was in labor. I had the misfortune of having to fight tooth and nail with said insurer to get them to pay for it.

 

I will burn the whole kit and caboodle when Anne (normal & healthy) turns 18 and hope something changes for the better, regardless of whether UHC is the route that is taken eventually. 

 

I admit, I am uncertain whether UHC would be simply a "quick fix," but this is an area where the phrase "you can pay me now, or you can pay me later" would seem to apply. Employer-based insurance, the system that has been in place for the last half-century, drives up the cost of goods and services provided by those employers, and fewer and fewer employers are offering anything, even HMOs (that were supposed to be the cure-all). Having large segments of the population uninsured (and tending to use expensive ER care) almost guarantees that those health-care providers have to recoup their losses by charging more to those who have insurance. Government-run care for all would no doubt drive up taxes. Regardless, I suspect our HC bureaucracy is here to stay, regardless of whose name is on the door.

 

Prof

 
February 5, 2008, 4:37 pm CST

News, Politics and Current Events

Ha Ha!!!

 

I've stolen the computer for a brief moment....   : )

 

Okay, since no one is EVER turned away from an American ER....why do Americans pay for private health insurance then?

 

Really I'm very curious about this.  Gee, I think I'd just (pardon my french) screw the entire thought of securing a health care insurer.....when all one must do is arrive at the hospital.

 

Or,

 

are those that aren't turned away later buried with a ginormous bill?

 

I'm truly curious....

 

<3

 

Fredi

 

 

 
February 5, 2008, 4:44 pm CST

News, Politics and Current Events

Also,

 

UHC has like I mentioned some difficulties and I fully believe these *snags* can / and are being ironed out with good solid leadership and with good solid intentions.

 

I don't have the time to find or look up some sources tonight, but lemme tell ya...

 

If there is a history of breast cancer.....then any doc up here begins mammograms and such generally between the ages of 20 to 25.

 

Otherwise, we Canuck's get out boobs squished regularly after the age of 40.

 

We are not so lacking as what is being portrayed IMO.  Certainly there are medical advances being made in other countries.

 

Some go to the US for medically superior procedures, some go to Europe, and YESS gasp...LOL

 

SOME actually come to Canada too!

 

 

<3

 

Fredi

 

 

 

 
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